Loose Change

Solo exhibition, Hopkins Center for the Arts, January 11 - February 11, 2018. 

Opening reception: January 11, 6-8pm  •  Artist talk: January 25, 5:30pm

"Loose Change, an exhibition of new colored pencil portraits by Minneapolis-based artist Russ White, reframes the concept of coin portraiture as a form of fine art... Instead of showcasing presidents and dignitaries, the portraits depict everyday people from many walks of life to show the beauty in the individual and our shared humanity. With its combination of realistic style and contemporary colors, the works of Loose Change feel both classic and of-the-time."  - Jahna Peloquin, Southwest Journal

"Taking a photorealistic approach, White gives a gravitas and prominence to his subjects, offering new meanings of how we view leaders and people of importance. With this work, the artist suggests the future of change exists within all of us." - Sheila Regan, City Pages


Situation Normal

Solo exhibition, Truckstop Gallery, March 4 - 19, 2017

An exhibition of sculptures, flags, and colored pencil drawings, Situation Normal is a reaction to our new political reality under the Trump Administration. The work uses orange and white barricades as a symbol both of our country's newfound state of anxiety and of the resistance to the unAmerican initiatives of this administration and Congress. Twenty percent of sales at the show were donated to Planned Parenthood and the Southern Poverty Law Center.


This Lawn Is My Lawn, collaboration with Preston Drum

This Lawn Is My Lawn was a collaborative installation by Russ White and Preston Drum in the basement of the Casket Arts Building in Minneapolis ahead of the 2016 presidential election.  Wood, cardboard, & paint; roughly 8 x 16 x 4'

Read more in Jenna Ross's write-up in the Star-Tribune.


Macro Machines

Solo exhibition, Gamut Gallery, April 2-23, 2016

A solo show of large scale colored pencil drawings, photographs, and sculptural installtions, "Macro Machines" is fundamentally about what forms us as individuals and as a society. The work reflects on childhood stresses and assumptions, attitudes about our national climate, and our difficult relationship with the natural world. It is at once funny and somber, personal and political, cartoonishly bright and darkly real.

"In his complicated setups, the cars act out traumas of modern life, often to wry or darkly comic effect." - Mary Abbe, Star Tribune

"With a coy sense of humor and a personal touch, the pieces challenge our current world with whimsy." - Sheila Regan, City Pages

"The large-scale works, a play on the tiny Micro Machine toys of White’s childhood, stand in for larger social institutions like the military, policy and the school system." - Eric Best, Southwest Journal


Illustration